Lilya Kaganovsky

Section 1

Professor of Gender and Women's Studies,Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies,Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Center for Global Studies

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Biography

Lilya Kaganovsky is Professor of Slavic, Comparative Literature, and Cinema Studies, and the Director of the Program in Comparative & World Literature at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Kaganovsky received her B.A. in Literature from U.C. Santa Cruz in 1992, with a specialization in English, American, and Russian Literature. She received her M.A. in Slavic Languages and Literatures from Columbia University in 1994; and her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature with an Emphasis in Film Studies from U.C. Berkeley in 2000. She has been at the University of Illinois since 2001, where she is affiliated with the Unit for Criticism & Interpretive Theory, the College of Media, the Department of Gender and Women's Studies, and the Program in Jewish Culture and Society, and the Initiative in Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies. 

Specializations / Research Interest(s)

  • Soviet and post-Soviet literature and film; film and critical theory; gender studies; women's cinema; sound studies

Education

  • Ph.D., University of California Berkley, 2000

Distinctions / Awards

  • 2017 Campus Distinguished Promotion Award, University of Illinois
  • 2013-2016 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Centennial Scholar, University of Illinois
  • 2011-2012 American Council of Learned Societies/Social Science Research Council/National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship
  • 2007-2008 Center for Advanced Study Fellow, University of Illinois

Courses

  • Russ/CWL 535: Nabokov
  • Russ 219: Russian & Soviet Cinema

Office Hours

  • Tuesdays 10am-12pm

Publications

Books

  • Sound, Speech, Music in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema. . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2013.
  • Kaganovsky, Lilya. How the Soviet Man Was Unmade. . University of Pittsburgh Press , 2008.

Book Contributions


  • "Thinking Again About Cold War Cinema." Cinema, State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 1917-1989: Re-Visions. . Routledge, 2014.

  • "Stalinist Cinema 1928-1953." The Russian Cinema: A Reader (Volume I: 1908 to the Stalin Era). . Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2013.

  • "The Cultural Logic of Late Socialism." The Russian Cinema: A Reader (Volume II: The Thaw to the Present). . Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2013.

  • "Russian Rock on Soviet Bones,." Sound, Speech, Music in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema. . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2013.

  • "Postmemory, Counter-memory: Soviet Cinema of the 1960s." The Socialist Sixties: Crossing Borders in the Second World. . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2013.

  • "Elektrische Sprache: Dsiga Wertow und die Tontechnologie / Electric Speech: Dziga Vertov and the Technologies of Sound." Resonanz-Räume: die Stimme und die Medien. . Berlin: Bertz & Fisher, 2012.

  • Kaganovsky, Lilya. "Solaris and the White, White Screen." Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture. . Ed. Valerie Kivelson and Joan Neuberger. Yale UP, 2008.

Journal Articles

  • "The Materiality of Sound: Esfir Shub’s Haptic Cinema / Материальность звука: кино касания Эсфири Шуб." Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie 120 (2013):
  • "The Homogenous Thinking Subject or Soviet Cinema Learns to Sing." Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema 6.3 (2013):
  • "Ways of Seeing: on Kira Muratova’s Brief Encounters and Larisa Shepit’ko’s Wings,." Russian Review 71.3 (2012):
  • "There is no acoustic relation: Considerations on sound and image in post-Soviet film." Qui parle: critical humanities and social sciences 19.1 (2010):
  • Kaganovsky, Lilya. "The Cultural Logic of Late Socialism." Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema 3.2 (2009): 185-199.
  • Kaganovsky, Lilya. "Men Wanted: Female Masculinities in Livnev’s "Hammer and Sickle"." Slavic and East European Journal 51.2 (2007): 229-246.
  • Kaganovsky, Lilya. "The Voice of Technology and the End of Soviet Silent Film: on Grigorii Kozintsev and Leonid Trauberg’s "Alone"." Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema 1.3 (2007): 265-281.