Current Research & Projects

Section 1

ntha Frost named IPRH Mellon Bio-Humanities Faculty Fellow for 2015–18
Meilleur
5/4/2015
The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities has named political science professor Samantha Frost as its Mellon Bio-Humanities Faculty Fellow for 2015–18. In this multi-year fellowship, Professor Frost will develop and lead a research group on this innovative, multidisciplinary topic. Her research group will include postdoctoral fellows, pre-doctoral fellows, and undergraduate interns. She will define and articulate the direction and goals of the research group, and also organize undergraduate symposia and develop a curriculum for an undergraduate certificate program in the bio-humanities. This is an exciting opportunity to establish the University of Illinois as an international leader in this emerging research frontier. Read more about the fellowship on the IPRH's web site.

Current Research & Projects

2015-2016 Research Initiatives and Faculty Awards

Samantha Frost named IPRH Mellon Bio-Humanities Faculty Fellow for 2015–18

The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities has named political science professor Samantha Frost as its Mellon Bio-Humanities Faculty Fellow for 2015–18. In this multi-year fellowship, Professor Frost will develop and lead a research group on this innovative, multidisciplinary topic. Her research group will include postdoctoral fellows, pre-doctoral fellows, and undergraduate interns. She will define and articulate the direction and goals of the research group, and also organize undergraduate symposia and develop a curriculum for an undergraduate certificate program in the bio-humanities. This is an exciting opportunity to establish the University of Illinois as an international leader in this emerging research frontier. Read more about the fellowship on the IPRH's web site.

 

GWS Professor Mimi Thi Nguyen awarded the IPRH fellow award for her work on The Promise of Beauty.

From Professor Nguyen's work abstract:

The Promise of Beauty argues the significance of beauty as a politics for thinking “history” (the conditions under which beauty endures) and “life” (what meaning beauty lends) itself. Following Jacques Rancière, I am interested in how the promise of beauty orders social and political relations and arrangements and renders them “sensible” as scenes of dispute and comparison for the care and cultivation of the beautiful (and oftentimes the suppression or annihilation of the ugly). Deprivation and violence might be laid bare where threats to beautiful things, persons, and even life-worlds are mobilized in narrative or aesthetic constructions to designate moments of crisis and vulnerability. But while a thing of beauty might describe the limits of a structure or practice –because such a structure or practice cannot sustain beauty— the promise of beauty can also recruit control or interference on beauty’s behalf. That is, the promise of beauty both engenders a critique of social arrangements and political structures, but also a call to action – for the reorganization of arrangements and attachments to their constitutive terms, such as beauty, but also freedom, truth, sovereignty, and life itself.

 

 

 

2014-2015 Research initiatives and faculty awards

INTERSECT RESEARCH GROUPS

Two GWS Faculty are participating in two-year INTERSECT Research Groups sponsored by the Graduate College. The dominant focus of INTERSECT is to develop innovative and collaborative environments for graduate education that will respond to the rapid rates of change within institutions of higher learning. This program will place graduate students trained in the arts and humanities at the University of Illinois at the forefront of interdisciplinary research. These students will be capable of producing new knowledge valuable across disciplines, creating transformative learning experiences, and developing high levels of expertise necessary to contribute to new and emerging fields relevant to life in the 21st century.

Assistant Professor Christine Taitano DeLisle (Chamorro) will continue the Global Indigenous Studies: The State of Play (2013-15). This innovative and multidisciplinary initiative launches the institutional frameworks necessary for robust graduate training in Indigenous studies. Along with shared commitments to the development of Native and Indigenous studies, the six-faculty-member team brings together expertise in history, literary studies, religion and theology, gender and sexuality studies, political science, and the history of consciousness. The team also enables access to an extensive network of scholars in the Indigenous world.
Envisioning global Indigenous studies as a field at and in play, this program will consider how indigeneity troubles and transforms disciplinarity at the site of technological invention and embodied performance. It will prepare students to navigate the interdisciplinary, transnational, and cross-cultural demands of inclusive global Indigenous studies. In addition to providing students with the necessary critical, methodological, and technical skills to address the most pressing needs of Indigenous peoples, this group will innovate new approaches in the field to theorize how Indigenous peoples figure within the edu-tainment domains of museums, sports, performance, and digital games. At the same time, students and faculty will consider how traditional embodied knowledge manifests in such sites of play and performance.
Students will learn how to develop research projects responsive to the needs of Indigenous peoples and will gain experience in working within and across disciplines to activate global indigeneity as an analytic frame.

Professor Chantal Nadeauwill continue with Cultures of Law in Global Contexts (2014-16). Cultures of Law in Global Contexts (CLGC), will create and promote intellectual exchange among the Humanities, Social Sciences, Arts, and Law to examine synergies of culture and law in various contexts. CLGC cultivates an interdisciplinary environment in which graduate students study the relationships between culture and law in a global framework, with attention both to macro phenomena and local histories.
The project grows out of recognition of the serious challenges emerging from the multiplicity of systems of justice globally, leading to confusion and confrontation on several fronts: clandestine economies and the criminalization of poverty; terrorism and ultranationalism; sustainability and economic development; gender, race, and immigration; medical law and ethics. These challenges require scholars to understand and communicate not only across national/continental/linguistic borders but also across disciplinary lines. Understanding multiple systems of justice is essential in an age where interactions among peoples from different cultural backgrounds increase with unprecedented speed and scale.

The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH )

IPRH Research Clusters

GWS Professors Teresa Barnes and Samantha Frost have received IPRH research clusters funding for the 2014-2015 academic year. Research Clusters are groups of faculty and graduate students from the University of Illinois campus who work together to explore particular questions or subjects in the humanities and arts. The goal of these clusters is to provide a structure for scholars with shared interests to collaboratively explore complex subjects with a level of support that will facilitate future development and funding. Research Clusters need not necessarily be composed of scholars from multiple disciplines. Instead, this initiative is intended as a form of internal development to help scholars from any discipline (or from multiple disciplines) to advance new knowledge in an area of inquiry.

Professor Teresa Barnes will act as research director for Leisurely Pursuits: Examining Kenyan Settler Cultures Through Play. Barnes' research interests include Political, gender and institutional histories of South African universities; Political history of Zimbabwe; Gender, memoir and autobiography.

Professor Samantha Frost, with co-director Jennifer Monson, will work on the Queer Ecologies project. Frost's research focuses on the ways that our understanding of matter, materiality, or embodiment shapes our concepts of politics.

IPRH Faculty Fellowships

GWS Professors Teresa Barnes and Ruth Nicole Brown have been awarded the competitive IPRH Faculty Fellowships for the 2014/2015 academic year. Professors Barnes and Brown are two of seven faculty on campus who have received the award.
Professor Teresa Barnes' project will focus on “Apartheid’s Professor: AH Murray, freedom and complicity in South Africa, 1948–85”. Professor Barnes' research interests include political, gender and institutional histories of South African universities; Political history of Zimbabwe; Gender, memoir and autobiography.
Professor Ruth Nicole Browns' project will focus on “Brown Girl Levitation: Racialized Gendered Genius and Expressive Culture”. Her research documents, analyzes, and interrogates Black girls’ lived experiences as it intersects with cultural constructions of Black girlhood.

Focal Point

GWS Professor Ruth Nicole Brown received Focal Point funding for her project More than Words: Engaging in a Collective Training and Application of Social Justice. Focal Point is a Graduate College initiative designed to stimulate new interdisciplinary research through collaborations among faculty and graduate students from multiple fields. Projects provide opportunities for graduate students to engage directly in the process of developing new research directions in areas of critical national and human need—including how to identify, define, and frame new research. Eight Focal Point projects have received funding for 2014-15.

Helen Corley Petit Scholar Award

Ruth Nicole Brown also received the prestigious Helen Corley Petit Scholar Award from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: Helen Corley Petit Scholar on the basis of her extraordinary record as an assistant professor. Helen Corley Petit, an alumna of the College of LAS who passed away in 2002, provided an endowment for the development of the scholarship and teaching of young faculty members in the College. This is a very competitive and prestigious award; winners are determined by the LAS Executive Committee following the review of all promotion and tenure dossiers in the college.

Criticism and Interpretive Theory Senior Research Fellow

The Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory has named GWS Professor Samantha Frost as a Criticism and Interpretive Theory Senior Research Fellow. This is a two-year award (2014-2016) that provides $8,000 in unrestricted research funds. Sam will be working on a project titled "Phenotype: A Case for the Meaning in Life." The Criticism & Interpretive Theory fellowship program was created with the help of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research in recognition of the Unit for Criticism’s ongoing goal of creating interdisciplinary dialogue across the humanities, social sciences, and performing arts. We welcome applications from all full-time associate and full professors who are affiliates of the Unit for Criticism & InterpretiveTheory.

 

Previous Projects and Awards

2013-2014 Research initiatives and faculty awards

INTERSECT RESEARCH GROUPS

Two GWS Faculty are participating in two-year INTERSECT Research Groups sponsored by the Graduate College.  The dominant focus of INTERSECT is to develop innovative and collaborative environments for graduate education that will respond to the rapid rates of change within institutions of higher learning.

Cultures of Law in Global Contexts

Cultures of Law in Global Contexts will establish an institutional framework for collaboration between the departments of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Economics, English, Gender and Women’s Studies, History, and Law. This team of faculty conducts multi-lingual, cross-disciplinary, and transnational research on the Middle East, China, Russia, the European Union, the United States, and Latin America. Through their relationships with the Illinois Program on Law, Behavior, and Social Science, the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory, the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, the Center for Law and Globalization, and the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, this group will forge new teaching and research methodologies to explore culture as a regulative force of practices and norms in law, and examine the ways law constitutes perceptions of justice, security, and development.
Participating faculty/staff include: Nuno Garoupa, Dan Shao, Siobhan Somerville, Feisal Mohamed, and Eugene Avrutin; Daniel Hamilton, Charlotte Ku,and Elizabeth Oyler.  Graduate Student Fellows include: Lauren Anaya (Anthropology), Peter Campell (Communication), Jin Gong (East Asian Languages and Cultures), Emily Metzner(Anthropology), T.J. Tallie (History), Kate Walkiewicz (English)

2013-14 Graduate Student Fellows include: Hee Jung Choi (Anthropology),Katherine Flowers (English and Writing Studies), Mark Frank (East Asian Languages and Cultures), Heather Freund (History), Sally Heinzel (History), Ligia Mihut (English).

2012-13 Graduate Student Fellows include: Lauren Anaya (Anthropology), Peter Campbell (Communication), Jin Gong (East Asian Languages and Cultures), Emily Metzner (Anthropology), T.J. Tallie (History), Kate Walkiewicz (English)

The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH )

The IPRH theme for the 2013–14 academic year is “The Body/Bodies.”

Taken in the singular, “the body” typically conjures a corporeal presence that can be human or otherwise. When pertaining to an animate figure, the body is a specific subject that is governed by physiological and environmental parameters, but also by historically and culturally specific structures such as the law, medicine, religion, language and much more. The body is a marker and a sign; it can be an encumbrance or a site of celebration; it may be free or incarcerated; disguised and deceptive, or candidly expressive; it can create just as it can also destroy and be destroyed. Questions about the body may include investigations of the “natural,” the biological or somatic (from the cellular to the genomic, and from the flesh to the viscera), or the representational; they may focus on the sensory and the sexual, and/or on mind-body interfaces. As an organism, the “body” has offered analogical possibilities for other systems, and investigations of those connections are welcome. One could also consider the term as pertaining to the inanimate or to collectivities and discernible masses—bodies of knowledge, bodies of work, bodies of water, the body politic—with all the implications such usages might carry.

Fiona Ngô is a Faculty Fellow for IPRH for 2013-2014. Ngô is a faculty in Asian American Studies and Gender and Women’s Studies and will be studying “Structures of Sense.” “Structures of Sense” considers the narration of Southeast Asian refugees’ bodies and senses through institutional sites such as immigration, the military, the medical-industrial complex, and citizenship. The aestheticization of refugee bodies critiques modes of imperialism, especially as wartime economies and ideologies generated flows of refugees arriving to the United States from various elsewheres, and the changing social and other institutions that surveilled, regulated, and governed these wayward bodies. In critiquing the narration of refugee bodies as traumatized, wounded, and outside the bounds of the normative citizen-subject, I examine Southeast Asian cultural production to comment on and create alternate subjectivities.

Faculty Fellows are released from one semester of teaching, with the approval of their departments and college, and receive a research allocation. Graduate Student Fellows receive a stipend from the IPRH. All IPRH Fellows are expected to remain in residence on the Illinois campus during the award year, and to participate in the Program’s yearlong interdisciplinary Fellows Seminar.

Karen Flynn, Dean's Fellow for 2013/2014

GWS Associate Professor Karen Flynn is one of three Dean's Fellows for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the 2013/2014 academic school year. The LAS Dean’s Fellows will be engaged in a variety of leadership activities in the college and on campus. They will assist the dean and the LAS cabinet with initiatives and critical activities in the college, bringing important perspectives from the faculty to the dean’s office.

Mimi Thi Nguyen, Conrad Humanities Scholar for 2013- 2018

These professorial scholar awards, funded by a gift from Arlys Conrad, are designed to support the work of exceptionally promising associate professors in humanities unites in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. These awards are designed to recognize tenured faculty members who are established or emerging leaders with exceptionally strong scholarly recognition and significant promise for continued achievement.

2012-13 Research Initiatives and Faculty Awards

INTERSECT RESEARCH GROUPS

Two GWS Faculty are participating in two-year INTERSECT Research Groups sponsored by the Graduate College.  The dominant focus of INTERSECT is to develop innovative and collaborative environments for graduate education that will respond to the rapid rates of change within institutions of higher learning.

Cultures of Law in Global Contexts

Cultures of Law in Global Contexts will establish an institutional framework for collaboration between the departments of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Economics, English, Gender and Women’s Studies, History, and Law. This team of faculty conducts multi-lingual, cross-disciplinary, and transnational research on the Middle East, China, Russia, the European Union, the United States, and Latin America. Through their relationships with the Illinois Program on Law, Behavior, and Social Science, the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory, the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, the Center for Law and Globalization, and the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, this group will forge new teaching and research methodologies to explore culture as a regulative force of practices and norms in law, and examine the ways law constitutes perceptions of justice, security, and development.
Participating faculty/staff include: Nuno Garoupa, Dan Shao, Siobhan Somerville, Feisal Mohamed, and Eugene Avrutin; Daniel Hamilton, Charlotte Ku,and Elizabeth Oyler.  Graduate Student Fellows include: Lauren Anaya (Anthropology), Peter Campell (Communication), Jin Gong (East Asian Languages and Cultures), Emily Metzner(Anthropology), T.J. Tallie (History), Kate Walkiewicz (English)

The Network for Neuro-Cultures

The Network for Neuro-Cultures brings together a team of faculty to investigate the processes by which neuroscientific methodologies weave humanistic modes of expression into research and scholarship. This group will prepare graduate students to mediate flows of knowledge between and within academic disciplines in order to create reflexive, inclusive neuroscholarship. The group is represented by faculty from English, Gender and Women’s Studies, History, Political Science, Religion, Cultural Kinesiology, Art + Design, and Neuroscience. Building upon extended networks of scholars in the United States and abroad, this group will train students to communicate across disciplines, become more self-reflexive in their own research approaches and claims, and learn how to build transdisciplinary collaborative research agendas.
Participating faculty include: Bruce Michelson, Melissa Littlefield, Sharra Vostral, Synthia Sydnor, Bruce Rosenstock, and Andrew Gaedtke; Neal Cohen, Arthur Kramer, and Deke Weaver

Intersect Neuro

Terri Barnes, Center for Advanced Study (CAS) Faculty Associate, 2012-13

Professor Teresa Barnes, Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and History, is appointed as a Center for Advanced Study (CAS) Faculty Associate for 2012-13.  Her research project is entitled: "Apartheid's Professor: A.H. Murray and the perils of academic liberalism in South Africa"
This project examinesthe complex career of Prof. Andrew Howson Murray (1905-1997), the long-serving head of thephilosophy department of the University of Cape Town in South Africa during the apartheid era. The question of why reasonable people participate willingly in acts of great injustice is an abiding puzzle bequeathed to us by the long and painful history of the 20th century. This project takes a new look at a South African variant of this problem by exploring how Murray also directly served the apartheidstate as a government censor, a witness for state prosecutors, and a researcher for the secret police. The man and the university shared a commitment to a paternalist liberalism that countenanced these seeming contradictions and, I argue, skewed understandings of academic freedom and the orientations of knowledge production. The project isthus concerned with questions of “the banality of evil” and the complicity of everyday people in systems of gross injustice, and particularly with the complicity of academics with systems of oppression. My study is deeply informed by theories of organizational culture which argue that gendered hierarchies underlie almost every aspect of the Western-style academy, includingthoseon the African continent. I alsouse gender theory to thread individual and institutional histories together. “Apartheid’s professor” was a passionate anti-Communist, so my explication of his career will resonate with studies of ideology and public discourse in totalitarian eras, and with studies ofthe many strands of political and educational liberalism in the apartheid and Cold War eras. Finally, my study will engage with the literature onpolitical transition and restorative justice and show how some prominent academic controversies in post-apartheid South Africa were rooted in the compromised liberalism of the 1950s and 1960s.

Teresa Barnes

Focal Point Projects

Focal Point, also funded by the Graduate College, is an initiative to stimulate intellectual communities of faculty and graduate students around topics that undergird important issues and problems of our times. Focal Point is designed to engage faculty and inspire graduate students to advance knowledge in areas of critical national and human need whether this be in global health and engineering, economic and social issues, humanities and arts, or challenges of understanding and communicating in an increasingly complex world.
Professor Mayo holds appointments in EPOL and Gender and Women's Studies..

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Research Seminar: Methodological Challenges and Opportunities

Project Organizers:
Cris Mayo, Education Policy, Organization & Leadership (faculty)
Joseph Robinson, Educational Psychology (faculty)
Elizabeth Holman, Human & Community Development (student)
Megan Paceley, Social Work (student)

With lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues at the forefront of many political debates today, researchers have an important role in providing empirical data to inform debates and policies. However, researchers face methodological challenges in studying LGBT issues, including specific ethical concerns, sampling and recruitment difficulties, and coding dilemmas when faced with diverse sexual identities. Despite these difficulties, questions regarding sexual orientation are beginning to appear more frequently on national surveys, providing a wealth of information about sexual minorities. With this field of study expanding, researchers now need to be addressing these methodological challenges, embracing study opportunities with this population, and pushing to connect research and practice. While gender and sexuality studies have increased within the humanities, interdisciplinary collaboration between humanities and the education and social sciences is limited. With an interdisciplinary focus, this seminar will trace the difficulties faced at each step in the research process and draw on creative and innovative methodological techniques to address these challenges--from ethical decisions and recruitment techniques to coding schemas and informing best practices. The project’s biweekly discussion reading groups and bi-semester panel presentations will culminate in a research symposium highlighting topics related to LGBT study and the innovative techniques developed and advanced throughout the seminar year. Projected outcomes include scholarly publications, conference presentations, and curriculum development for a graduate-level course in sexuality and research. This seminar is intended to benefit both those researchers studying LGBT populations specifically and also those simply seeking to incorporate more diverse samples into their own fields of study.


2011-12

Queer Performance Series
An IPRH Collaborative Research Project

Project Organizers:Martin Manalansan (Anthropology/Asian American Studies), Jennifer Monson (Dance), Chantal Nadeau (Gender and Women’s Studies), Richard T. Rodríguez (Latina and Latino Studies/English), Siobhan Somerville (English/Gender and Women’s Studies)
About the Project: The visiting speaker series on Queer Performance will feature two experimental performance artists, Jennifer Miller and Alina Troyano (as Carmelita Tropicana), both widely recognized for their important roles in expanding the possibilities for using performance to explore the politics of sexuality, gender, race, and social justice. Each speaker will present a lecture/performance that is free and open to the public; both events will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Knight Auditorium of Spurlock Museum. Jennifer Miller will present a talk on Tuesday, October 25 entitled “How To Wear a Beard: Reflections on a Life in the Sideshow, the Circus, and the Academy.” Carmelita Tropicana’s presentation, "Ole/Ghost and Performance Art Manifesto," will take place on Friday, November 4.

“Women and Children First”: Critical Inquiries in Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organizations and the Global Governance of Care
A 2011-23 Focal Point Project

Project Organizers:
Soo Ah Kwon, Human & Community Development/Asian American Studies (faculty)
Mimi Nguyen, Gender & Women’s Studies/Asian American Studies (faculty)
Sarah Casinelli, English (student)
Fay Hodza, Human & Community Development (student)

Abstract:
Nonprofit and Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are called upon as solutions to an ever-widening array of social problems, including world poverty, economic development, sexual health “crises,” environmental degradation, and even criminal activities such as human trafficking. These organizations produce often-consequential rhetorics and pursue decisive actions in promoting social justice and otherwise rectifying social inequalities. As such, these organizations often target what are considered the most vulnerable and marginalized populations in need of care – women and children. Situated outside of formal political governments as the instruments of a global civil society, nonprofits and NGOs are often cast as independent of and sometimes in opposition to state governance. Yet a growing body of literature points to the ways in which nonprofits and NGOs serve as ostensible surrogates for serving -and funding- social welfare for neoliberal states and intergovernmental organizations, facilitating neoliberal aims of economic liberalization and privatization of public resources, even while propagating seemingly universal principles of self-empowerment and participation. Embedded in these endeavors are discourses and practices targeting women and children for their particular potential as moldable, especially because they are vulnerable, liberal (and Western) democratic subjects of a global governance of care. We will examine the nature of nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations and their relations to states and a global civil society, the positioning of civil society and its institutions in promoting a more democratic world, and the interface of civil society with the academy as a topic of scholarship and collaboration. Such analytical investigations will provoke new, exciting ideas and emerging scholars and practitioners capable of understanding the complex networks of globalization and diversity (especially focused here on women and youth) as categories for pursuing critical inquiry and producing academic studies. Other outcomes will include publications and a new interdisciplinary graduate seminar.


Race, Region, and Sexual Diasporas
2010-11 Focal Point Project and IPRH Collaborative Research Project:

Co-organizers
Martin Manalansan, Anthropology and Asian American Studies Program (faculty), Chantal Nadeau, Gender and Women’s Studies (faculty and director), Richard Rodriguez, English and Latina/o Studies (faculty), Siobhan Somerville, English/Gender and Women’s Studies (faculty)?Sarah Cassinelli, English (graduate student,Ryan Jones, History (graduate student)

Abstract
Our activities, including a regularly scheduled reading group and two public symposia, will assemble and sustain a group of graduate students and faculty to investigate and generate new scholarship on “Race, Region, and Sexual Diasporas” in the interdisciplinary field of queer studies. Questions about temporality and space have become important sites for debate within queer studies, suggesting new ways of calibrating research on flows of capital, information, people, knowledge, and culture. Our activities will explore this scholarship in depth and will serve as a catalyst for the production of new research on these questions. We will ask, for example: What are the possibilities or limitations afforded by a focus on transnational “regions” for mapping gay, lesbian, transgender or queer worlds? To what extent do different models of queer regionalism deterritorialize or reterritorialize queer culture within or beyond geopolitical boundaries? How do areas defined by market, state, and labor relationships within global capitalism require shifts in how we think about the production and movement of specific racial, sexual, and gender norms and cultures? How does an emphasis on the rural demand reconsideration of commonly held assumptions about the production of sexual identities, race, and queer culture?? ?In collaboration with the reading group, a symposium on “Queering the Middle: Sexual, Diasporas, Race, and a Queer Midwest,” is being planned for October 7-8, 2010. In April 2011, we will hold a graduate student symposium as a culmination of the year’s activities. We intend to pursue the publication of original scholarship from these symposia, in either a peer-reviewed scholarly journal or an anthology. In the long term, a new graduate course on “Queer Region: Race, Region, and Sexual Diasporas,” based on our activities, will be developed for the Gender and Women’s Studies program and potentially cross-listed with another unit.

Samantha Frost, recipient of 2010 Andrew Mellon New Directions Fellowship
http://www.pol.illinois.edu/alumni/newsletter/10_sp_frost.html